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Dinnington Community Primary School

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Writing Activities 15.06.20 - 19.06.20

Father's Day Poem

 

It is Father's day on Sunday so I thought today we could have a go at writing a poem for your Dad. Before we start on the poem we need to think of some words that describe your Dad, take 5 minutes now to write down all the adjectives that describe your Dad. 

 

Words like:

smart

funny

kind

caring

 

Now take 5 minutes to think about all the things Dad does for you. 

 

Such as:

Plays football with me

Cooks my tea

Reads to me

Takes me to the park

 

Now lets try to put these ideas in to a poem. Here is my example:

 

My Dad is ...

 

My Dad is kind.

My Dad is caring.

My Dad is funny.

My Dad is smart.

 

My Dad plays football with me.

My Dad cooks my favourite tea.

My Dad likes to read to me.

My Dad takes me to the park.

 

Have a go at writing your own My Dad is ... poem. 

Lesson 9 - Write

 

Today we are going to write our spells! Have you been rehearsing what you are going to write make sure your have your best wizard hat on. 

 

You should use your plan to create your fantastic spells. This is how I used my plan to create a spell as good as George's. This is my plan:

 

I used most of the things in my plan for my spell can you spot them:

 

Mix and stir the mixture up,

Adding things in cup by cup.

Eye of newt, plop,

wiggly worm, drop,

Tounge of rat, 

And wing of a bat.

Round and round the mixture goes,

Frothing, foaming, fizzing

Sizzle, swooshing and ruby red.

Bubbling, boiling and think it is ready,

Poor Grandma best take it steady.

 

I have highlighted all the bits I have included from my plan so you can see how my plan has helped me. You can see though that once I had my wizard hat on I added a few extra bits so my spell could rival one of Harry Potters!

 

Here are some features you might want to include in your spell:

(Year 2 should aim to include everything on this list)

  • Rhyming
  • Alliteration
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Power adjectives
  • Remember your spell is like a poem so try to keep you lines short. 

 

Non-negotiables:

  • Full stops
  • Capital letters
  • Finger spaces
  • Commas (for year 2 only)
  • Best Handwriting

 

Good Luck!

 

Challenge:

Why not practice saying your spell and record it to show everyone when we get back to school?

 

 

Lesson 8 - Plan

 

Today we are going to plan our spells. Have a look at the spell below again can you see what you will need to include:

 

Have you picked out the features of the spell?

 

These are the things I noticed:

 

Can you make a plan now thinking about what you want to include in your spell?

 

  • Look at you list of ingredients and the alliteration you created using adjectives to describe them. Which ones do you want to include in you spell?

 

  • Gather a list of the ingredients you want to include. You only need to couple of these to add to your spell. 

 

  • Think about how you could make your lines rhyme. Do your ingredients rhyme or could you use an adjective that rhymes? Remember not all you lines have to rhyme but it would sound good if a couple of your rhymes did. 

 

  • Look at the word bank you created yesterday of words that sound like the sound they make. Can you pick out 3 of your favourite to use in your spell?

 

 

Your plan might look something like this:

 

Once you have made your plan you could try to say your spell to see which words work best this will help you improve your plan ready to write your spell tomorrow. 

 

Lesson 7 - Onomatopoeia

 

Today we are going find some onomatopoeic words that you can use in your spells. Onomatopoeia means when a word sound like the sound it makes - like bang, smash, sizzle. 

 

Can you write down all the ones you can see in George's spell?

 

‘Fiery broth and witch’s brew
Foamy froth and riches blue
Fume and spume and spoondrift spray
Fizzle swizzle shout hooray
Watch it sloshing, swashing, sploshing
Hear it hissing, squishing, spissing
Grandma better start to pray.’ 

 

Why do you think Roald Dahl has used these kind of words?

Does it make it easier for you to imagine what the potion is like?

Can you hear the cook up?

 

Have a go at picking the best onomatopoeic words that you can use in your spell. You could pick some words that create alliteration with the ingredients in your potion, or maybe words that rhyme. 

 

 

Lesson 6 - Alliteration

 

Can you remember what alliteration is?

 

It's when two words close together start with the same letter or sound. 

E.G.          slimy snake,  revolting rat,  poisonous pills

 

Can you pick out the alliterations in George's spell?


‘Fiery broth and witch’s brew
Foamy froth and riches blue
Fume and spume and spoondrift spray
Fizzle swizzle shout hooray
Watch it sloshing, swashing, sploshing
Hear it hissing, squishing, spissing
Grandma better start to pray.’

 

Can you make a list of the alliteration in your yellow book?

 

Lots of famous writers have written spells for their books and play. One of the most famous is William Shakespeare and he wrote a spell for the witches to say when there were making a potion in his play Macbeth.

 

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg and howlet’s wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.


Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Cool it with a baboon’s blood,
Then the charm is firm and good.

 

Can you spot any alliteration in his spell?

 

Today we are going to create some phrases using alliteration that you could use in your spell. Look at the spells above and your ingredients can you create some really interesting phrases to use in your own spell? 

 

 

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